Skip to main content

Translation Unit

The PVUSD Special Services Translation Unit is a team of six (6) translators who provide professional services for Spanish-speaking families to administrators and case managers in the Special Services Department.

Translation vs. interpretation

What's the difference?

Translators = Write

Interpreters = Speak

Our Special Services Translators do both!

Types of Interpretation

CONSECUTIVELY
The interpreter takes turns with the other speakers. The person speaks, then stops. The interpreter steps in to interpret, then stops. If long statements are made, the interpreter may take notes to ensure accuracy. Because speakers alternate, events with consecutive interpretation may take up twice as long. Be sure to take this into account when scheduling your meeting.

SIMULTANEOUSLY
In this case, the interpreter speaks at the same time as the other speaker, lagging a few seconds behind. When there is only one listener, the interpreter may whisper in their ear. Because interpreting simultaneously requires immense concentration, meetings that are longer than 2 hours should be broken into parts, if possible.

how to work with an interpreter effectively

four

two

three

four

five

six

seven

eight

nine


SCHEDULE YOUR MEETING
& provide information in advance

 

SPEAK SLOWLY & CLEARLY
one person at a time

 


SPEAK DIRECTLY TO ONE ANOTHER
not to the interpreter
 



AVOID SIDE CONVERSATIONS
so as not to distract or divert the meeting
 


THE INTERPRETER WILL INTERPRET EVERYTHING THEY HEAR
including foul language & side conversations
 

 

WHEN USING ACRONYMS
explain what they mean

 

EXPLAIN TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY
at least the very first time you refer to it during the meeting

 

THE INTERPRETER MAY ASK FOR A BREAK
if needed although this is rare
 


THE INTERPRETER MAY ASK FOR CLARIFICATION
when needed from parents, personnel, or other team members